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Weeransole Ruins  -   Paluvilandawa Tank Ruins
Paluvilandawa Tank
10/26/2013
Paluvilandawa Tank
12/07/2013
Paluvilandawa Tank
12/07/2013
Paluvilandawa Tank
12/07/2013
Paluvilandawa Tank
12/07/2013
Paluvilandawa Tank
12/07/2013
Paluvilandawa Tank
12/07/2013
Paluvilandawa Tank
12/07/2013
Paluvilandawa Tank
12/07/2013
Paluvilandawa Tank
12/07/2013
Paluvilandawa Tank
12/07/2013

The road to Paluvilandawa Tank is to the left about 150 meters after Percy Bendi Wewa. The ruins are found just before the tank, which does not hold water due to a breach in the bund. Goonatilake, who conducted an Archeological survey in Wilpattu refers to these ruins as Weeransole Ruins and below is an account of what he states about these ruins. 

“Weeransole ruins near the Paluvilandawa tank has not been recorded by any previous workers and consisted of three destroyed Buddha statues, including two seated (Samadhi) and one standing statue. A well-preserved Seated (Samadhi) statue was brought to the Park entrance (Hunuvilagama) during the 1980s by Army offices, which can be seen at present in the image house. This statue is very similar to the Samadhi Buddha statue at Anuradapura. One of the destroyed Samadhi Buddha statue seated under the hood of Naga King Muchalinda, is of a rare type. These three types of Buddha statues were recorded from eastern province; two from Seruvila Mangala Rajamaha viharaya off Trincomale and one from Kantale sugar plantation, which are currently displayed at the Archaeological Museum at Anuradapura (Godakumbura, undated). This is the fourth known Buddha statue belonging to this posture. Broken Lotus pedestal, which belongs to standing Buddha statue can also be seen at the site. The body of the statue is 1.15m in height and its head and arms were missing. The name of the site is unknown and no such inscriptions are still found in the sites. The site has also been excavated and destroyed by treasure hunters, and needs immediate conservation action.”
I visited this site in December 2013. The rare seated statute mentioned above had been damaged from the waist above and the standing statute was broken from the feet and lying on the ground. The photo of the well-preserved seated statute above (Samadhi Statute), which is currently at the park entrance, is from this site.

Reference
Goonatilake, W.L.D.P.T.S. de A. (2006) Archaeologically important sites in Vilpattu National Park: present status and new findings. National Archaeological Symposium 2006: Papers submitted to the National Archaeological symposium. 1: 57-80.