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Common Name : Indian and Ceylon Paradise Flycatcher      -       Scientific Name : Terpsiphone paradisi paradise / ceylonensis       -       Other Name : Siuru Hora/ Sudu Redi Hora (S)
Hunuwilagama
04/11/2010
Hunuwilagama
04/11/2010
Hunuwilagama
04/11/2010
Hunuwilagama
04/11/2010
Herathhamy Wala
12/08/2013
Herathhamy Wala
12/08/2013
Kohombansanchai pooval
12/13/2015
Kohombansanchai pooval
02/09/2016

These magnificent birds are found from Turkestan to Manchuria, India, Sri Lanka and the Malay Archipelago.

Fourteen subspecies have been recognized across its range. The subspecies that is found in Sri Lanka is a breeding resident population and is found in the dry lowlands and lower hills are T. p. ceylonensis. The Indian Paradise Flycatcher T. p. paradise migrates from India and can be found throughout the country during the season.

The young Indian males are chestnut in colour but the mature males are white. The resident males are chestnut in colour but has a shorter tail and a longer crest that the Indian males. The females of both races has a shorter tail, are chestnut in colour with a grey throat.

The conservation status of this species is regarded as “Least Concerned” (National Red List 2012).

This is a species protected under the Fauna and Flora Protection Ordinance as amended by Act No. 22 of 2009.

I have observed the migrant species throughout the island and observed the nesting of the resident race at many locations in the low country dry zone. This is a common bird and still can be seen during the migrant season in the well-wooded gardens of Colombo.

Breeding pairs build a very neat cup shaped nest lined with cobwebs. I have observed nest building at many localities in the dry zone including Wilpattu. Both the male and female share the labour of building the home for their young. Before retiring for the night these birds will invariably gather at a water hole or a nearby stream for a bath. These cautious birds will fly over the water a few occasions before deciding to plunge in to the same in typical flycatcher fashion. It is a beautiful sight to observe the male with their long tail streamers plunging in and out of water. 

It is a common species at Wilpattu and I have observed both the races. During the migrant season both the races can be observed through out the park.